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Ostomy

Ileoscopy

As an IBD person I go in for check ups with my gastroenterologist every 6 months. Part of that includes a periodic inside peek at my digestive tract to make sure everything is going well. Originally Gastro and I were hoping for a capsule endoscopy (pillcam) which I have used in the past with success. When insurance denied the request we turned to ileoscopy to meet our goals.

Ileoscopy is a procedure where a thin tube called an endoscope enters through the stoma to view the bowel. Smaller than the diameter of most adult fingers, the endoscope is equipped with light, a camera, video camera, the ability to add air and water and tools to take a sample, if needed.

Thanks to the fact that I’m an ileostomate, scope prep was pretty easy and is the same I would have done for the pillcam. No food the day before, just clear liquid until midnight and nothing until after the scope.

Procedure day I got there early. If someone cancels, sliding into the open place is a perk I don’t want to miss out on.

Sedation – Now this is where my experience may differ from others. I prefer to be scoped unsedated. I like being able to participate in the scoping experience by shifting or moving if needed to get the best view possible. I like the ability to ask questions and get answers in real time from the number one expert in the room. Because I am involved and aware I understand the thought process of samples taken as my gastro is really good at explaining as we go, and we both look forward to follow up from the lab. For me, unsedated is worth any discomfort experienced.
*I have had sedated scopes. I simply prefer not to if at all possible.*

Because I’ve been having scopes and cams for ages now, I figured I’d go over a few pros and cons that might be helpful to know so you can plan for a successful time.

Pro Pillcam It’s really stinking cool. Requires no sedation. Depending on the type used it takes two to four images per second as it travels. All that information is streamed to your gastro office where they can review the pictures and get a result back to you as soon as the following day. (Depending on availability in your gastro office) The least invasive way to have a look at your insides.

Con Pillcam Go in early to swallow pill cam. You then leave to walk around with a device strapped to your stomach looking a little too much like a suspicious character for decent people. (The nurse will gently remind you to stay away from libraries and courthouses to avoid ending up on the evening news.) Follow eating and drinking directions throughout the day as you wait on motility to work its magic. Once the pillcam is out you then drive all the way back to the clinic to turn the crime scene esque equipment back in. It’s an all day waiting game. If you’re driving a distance to get to your GI, this can be a huge detractor. (One of the reasons why I really dislike it.) It exhausts an entire day. Things I do to help myself out: Walk around. Exhaustively. Get those bowels moving to pass the pill camera along as rapidly as possible. In my experience, pillcam day is not for taking in a movie, it’s a day for speed walking.

*You’ll want to discuss with your doc any possibility of narrowing or obstruction that could make passing the pill difficult.*

Pro Scope If you recover quickly from sedation, you could leave with an understanding of how things went. If you are a non sedation person, you have on the spot knowledge and can drive yourself to the next task of your day without delay. In and out then on your way. In addition, a scope allows you to take samples and manipulate tissue at the time of viewing. A bonus if you’re like me and don’t want to make a separate appointment for scoping on another day for results you want right away. I’m eager like that.

Con Scope
If you prefer sedation:
You will need to arrange for a driver to wait for you and take you home.
Depending on how quickly you recover, you may need someone to stay with you for a bit after going home.
Wait for discussion on findings with GI until follow up appointment or phone call meeting.
Gas. Air is used to make it easier to see. Once you’re done that gas makes its way out. This can be uncomfortable for some.

If you prefer non sedation:
Squeamishness about your body functions, bowels and the process it takes to look at them is not helpful for success. You must be okay with the idea and participate in the process of someone sticking a tube in your bum or stoma and looking around.
Gas. See above.

Commonalities
Bowel prep required. Ileostomates generally have a bit easier time than those with more parts. Follow the prep your doc prescribes, no food and lots of fluids until it’s time for nothing orally and you’re hopefully clear and ready to go. No cheating. Your doc can see if there’s residue and you’ll have to re test.

At the end of the day the scope went well. When you think about it, it really wasn’t a big deal at all. I am grateful to have a doctor on my team that shares the mindset of prevention first. Because Crohn’s Disease is a shifty little devil, you can have active inflammation even when you’re otherwise feeling fine. We approach Crohn’s Disease with the mindset of stamping out a campfire versus trying to save a forest engulfed in flames; prevention over recovery. A very important distinction that uses tools like regular check ups, pill cams, scopes and lab work to endeavor to keep the IBD flame extinguished and me feeling as healthy as possible.

I made a little video to give you an idea of how it went. Watch it if you like.

 

Recap and Looking Forward

This is one of those catching you up, what the heck has Christy been up to sorts of posts.

Looking Back
I think of 2015 as the year of perseverance. It was a mix of really amazing opportunities, adventures of all sorts and some moments that were super challenging.

Bit of a Bump
2015 started out with a surgery to have my gallbladder removed by a new-to-me surgeon. Up until then I had been really spoiled with having one surgeon who did all my work for the last twenty- ish years. Thankfully my Gastro referred a very skilled person and all went well.

Got Awesome
Next came the 2015 #IBDSocialCircle. This was my first IBD conference where I would get to meet other advocates. I was super excited and didn’t know quite what to expect. I knew Sara Ringer would be there and that was it. I met the very nicest IBD Advocates, did my best to live tweet an IBD Social Circle Round Table, got a sneak peek at upcoming endeavors designed to improve the lives of patients and collaborate with fellow advocates during an all day meeting.  I was in Gastro Lady Heaven!

Got Exciting
As soon as I got home from the IBD Conference Where my Wildest IBD Dreams Came True – I dove head first into buying a house and moving.  I seriously put my luggage and IBD Conference swag into a box, taped it shut and kept going until June.

Challenging
So we have this house and are pretty excited to have a cozy little place just right for us where we could be Zen with our offspring.  We went in knowing there was some yard work and painting to do. And we were cool with that, as long as the house was sound. It would be a fun adventure. That notion lasted for about a minute before the peace and opportunity for transformation that was our house began to resemble that 1986 movie, Money Pit, with Tom Hanks and Shelley Long. Repairs – bugs- wilderness- rodents- pluming – broken major appliance- tenting and gassing, multiple roof issues, water damage, interior wall repairs and on. So far home ownership has been one adventure after another.

Secondary Disease
So I have Meniere’s Disease. It’s not fun. I did a post about it to give you an idea. About a month after we moved into our home, it decided to be really active. Meniere’s is quite ambushy and took some serious trial and error to figure out how to get some relief. I would like to tell you things are better. They just aren’t. I take sedating meds which somewhat calm down my ears before doing fun things and I keep food down because of sublingual anti nausea meds. Thanks to continuous tinnitus, I don’t have silence anymore. My hearing drops out for short periods of time in one and sometimes both ears frequently enough for me to mention it to you. It’s an ongoing process.

Crohn’s Disease
I see my Gastro on the regular, like ya do, and he reminds me it’s been a minute since we’ve done a pill cam. So I do that and it’s super amazing because the geek in me loves all that medical science working its way through. Plus it was one of the new systems that don’t use all the stickers but a large sensor plate worn belt style. (Future post about that) My pictures came out clean, my blood work came back lovely. The words ‘It looks like you are in REMISSION.’ were spoken. My Gastro brings up the idea of going off meds. And so that’s what we do. I am still amazed and really grateful about every bit of this last paragraph.

Busy
Otherwise known as ‘Mamas going back to school!’ With both kids stable and at their school during the day, it was time for me to go back and work on my education. I was super excited and optimistic that this time it would all work out. I was older, my health was more stable and with that pesky gall bladder out and an Ostomy on my team this go around, college was really going to happen for me. And it did. But the start wasn’t as smooth as I would have hoped. Those credits I managed to earn twenty years ago didn’t transfer. So I was starting over from scratch. At first I was pretty bummed but then I decided it would be okay. After all, I’m going back to gain skills to be an even better advocate. Psychology, public speaking, writing and more will help me be better at what I enjoy.  As long as I keep my goals up front, I can’t be bummed about that.

Recovery aka Holidays
Holidays marked the end of my first term back in school. I was proud to earn a solid B in Psychology, consistently work on home repairs with The Husband, and have time to relax with festive tree trimming and cookie making. Much needed time off with my wee family and Grandparents down for a visit was the perfect ending to a rollercoaster year.

Looking Forward to 2016
*First of all, I’ve got the hang of this college thing and I love it. My schedule works around my children’s time in class and I still keep my weekly volunteer time at their school. I’m taking classes that apply to my advocacy love and dream job which feels really good.

*Our hard work has paid off. The house is stable enough where we can divert some of our resources towards yard work – which I love.

*Back to Creating
With all that work going on there was limited time for fun stuff. It felt like we were always coming home to another thing to fix. Now it looks like the road is becoming more even. I’m getting back into the swing of being creative again. I’ve begun to crochet a little, write more and hopefully paint something that isn’t an interior wall.

Part of that goodness is that I’m back to sharing with you, but in a more rounded, balanced way. Sometimes I feel like I don’t have a lot of new IBD related things to say. But being a Crohn’s Disease patient and Ostomate, my everyday life is very relevant. There are things I do now I never dreamed I would ever be able to do when I was sick. And while I am well now, I know Crohn’s Disease could come back tomorrow and do its best to take all this goodness away. I am very aware of that.
And so to fit that intent I have a new page look which will continue to evolve. If you like it, thank my husband. He really listened to what I wanted and is making that happen in real life. He really is a sweetheart.

Thank you for reading and catching up on my 2015 recap. It’s amazing to look back on a year of change and learn from those experiences. I am eager to see what 2016 has in store.

IBD Social Circle Whirlwind

Wow has life been a bit of a whirlwind. It was only a couple weeks ago that I attended the IBD Social Circle Summit. It was an amazing, uplifting and inspiring experience. I got to meet IBD advocates that I follow and admire for their educating and bare honesty. I tweeted at a live IBD Round Table which was amazing! Then there was a day of focus groups with best care for the IBD community in mind. And the finest topper of all was the honor of attending the premier of Ryan Stevens’ documentary Swimming with Courage & Crohn’s. If you have not had the opportunity to view this documentary, please do.

RyanDocumentary
Frank, Marisa, Amber, Ryan, Samantha, Sara and Dan. Panelists for the Swimming with Courage & Crohn’s documentary.

About a year ago on Lake Erie Swim 4 IBD Day and into the night I remember sequestering myself away with my lap top to capture any type of update and follow Sara Ringer’s posts as Ryan captivated us all in his grueling super human battle across Lake Erie to raise awareness for Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis. #XErie4IBD. I sat there with my heart in my throat part cheering Ryan on, part nervous for his safety, a large part really proud. With that bystanders experience as reference I listened as panelists added further insight that served to paint a more vibrant picture of the days events. Ryan was already a beacon of hope within the community before the documentary. To see in stark detail was humbling, empowering, and powerful. The thoughtful preparation, determination, courage, and grit to do what Ryan did all to spread awareness about a disease and to give hope to others. WOW!

Zero dry eyes.

Janssen did a top job of reflecting truth onto film. Even more so, Janssen understood. You can’t make that kind of experience come alive if you stand separate from the cause. To see Ryan portrayed as the strong, raw, honest Crohn’s Disease fighter that he is, really mattered. IBD patients deserve that kind of dignity and respect. Janssen did that.

IBDFamilyPicDC
IBD Family Washington D. C.

 

The next morning I hopped on over to the DDW and experienced its Gastro Health Mecca. A landscape of booths laid out as far as the eye can see, filled with people excited to tell you about their products.

20150517_091953
Next time I’m either hugging or voguing this thing. My photographer strongly discouraged such high-jinks. Darn!
20150517_100411
The future of Gastro care spread below. I can feel the excitement. Woo Hoo!

 

All too soon it was time to head home.

Quite a wonderful adventure for sure. One that was a dream come true on multiple fronts.

The whirlwind picked up again as soon as I got home with child shenanigans, volunteerism, visiting relatives and home buying. Eek! We’re buying a home!

Here I sit typing to you; existing half in boxes. Tomorrow I work as a team with my Hubby to transport life and family to the next phase of our adventure with as little chaos as possible.

If it fits, it ships...or something like that. Glad to be doing this for the last time in a long time.
If it fits, it ships…or something like that. Glad to be doing this for the last time in a long time.

And the whirlwind continues.

Because college is next!

World IBD Day 2015

World IBD Day 2015

A while back I wrote a guest blog called 23andMe – Be a Part of the IBD Genetics Study for The Great Bowel Movement sharing my experiences with the 23andMe DNA test kit.  23andMe is doing a genetic study whose goal is to discover the building blocks that make up IBD so that we may better understand it, and in the end create better treatments and ultimately a cure.

A short time later 23andMe asked to use quotes from the article and images from my blog page. To which I responded with something like: “Go for it!”  Talk about following through.  So on this World IBD Day I was pleasantly surprised with this super cool Ta Da!  The image they created is beautiful.  And a pretty nifty thing for a kid from small town Silverton, Oregon.  I hope it helps boost Ostomate pride, IBD awareness and the ongoing efforts as an entire community to find effective treatments and ultimately cure.

So if you feel like it, go check out the 23andMe page, The Great Bowel Movements page and my article.  Perhaps you’d like to participate as well?

Glad To Be Back

Hello my lovelies! I’m glad to be back so I can share all the good nuggets with you. I spent most of the first day back napping, recovering and just starting to get caught up with everyone. What an exciting whirl wind of IBD Family and all things new and better for the IBD community. I am super excited for the future and can’t wait to share my experiences with you. I had the best time at the ‪#‎IBDSocialCircle‬ and exploring ‪#‎DDW‬ convention. There are just so many cool things to fill you in on that I will be breaking it up into different posts. But I wanted to first off say a thank you to Janssen and Tonic for making this trip possible. From food we could eat to making sure we got to our events, staying up and visiting late into the night and every tiny thing in between; we felt cared for like out of town family.

I also want to assure you that I kept my fan girling to a minimum as to not scare away the super awesome advocates that surrounded me at every turn. You would be proud of the self control.

And because this event was held in Washington D. C. I got to explore some of our nations great historical treasures with my new Canadian friend Jen of Crohnic-Crohns. Such a sweet heart. You should really go check out her page.

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Jen of Crohnic-Crohns in front of the Embassy of Canada. Check out those beautiful flags, Eh?

*Disclaimer~ This snap shot was taken later in the Washington D.C. IBD Blogger Awesome Adventure. But it was the only photo I took of the Lovely Jen as I was living in the moment so much I didn’t capture as many images as I later wished I had.

**Note to self: Must take WAY more pictures next time!

Remember Who You Are


Ostomy Beautiful
Please remember who you are:
You are lovely just the way you are. You have earned the right to be okay in your own skin. You have earned the right not to hide. So Don’t. Your life and your story are valuable.

 

Tobacco Free Florida

Photo credit: Tobacco Free Florida Facebook page
This is the image used by Tobacco Free Florida in its attempt to scare smokers into quitting with the possible prospect of Ostomy. Photo credit: Tobacco Free Florida Facebook page. Click link for more. *Edit to add: Tobacco Free Florida has taken down this image from its Facebook page. It is still on their Twitter @tobaccofreefla *

I saw this and thought, ‘Wow! That’s a great big bucket of nonsense right there.’  I actually had to look at it twice to make sure I was reading it correctly.  I get what’s happening.  Tobacco Free Florida is trying to discourage smoking.  But the attempt is cringe worthy.  Making a point and doing it accurately in this instance are two very different things.  One is credible and truthful.  The other uses fear tactics and over exaggeration to sway the reader.

Yes, smoking can lead to colorectal cancer.  However, not all with colorectal cancer require Ostomies.  There are so many treatment options available that Ostomy is frequently temporary or unnecessary.  And for those that require permanent Ostomy, it has saved their lives.  Ostomy is not the bad guy, cancer is.

This campaign is holding up Ostomy as a negative consequence of smoking.  As if one would stop smoking this instant because of an Ostomy bag.  Highly unlikely.  If I were to count the negative consequences of smoking, an Ostomy seems minimal when held up against lung cancer, stroke, heart attack, and C.O.P.D. which recently took our beloved Leonard Nimoy.  Deadly.  And those are just a few.  Ostomies are not deadly.

Ostomies save lives every single day.  To shame the very tool that would save future cancer survivors is wrong, uneducated, and extremely dangerous.  What will you tell the person who actually needs an Ostomy, but won’t get one, because you made it a big scary thing to be avoided at all cost?  Because those are the exact people I help all the time.  Please hear me when I say, you are doing a huge disservice to those you profess to want to help.  Villainizing Ostomies is not the way to go.

And the caption “Do you know what this is? You probably will if you’re diagnosed with cancer in your colon or rectum.”  is a sideways swipe at those who smoke as a ‘This is your Scary future if you don’t stop.  Ostomies are Bad and Undesirable.  Smoke and you’ll have to get one.’  Adult boogie man stories with Ostomy as the monster under the bed.  Shaming and scaring with a medical appliance.

Speaking of medical appliances…. If I may point out, the bag in the middle is a urostomy bag.  For urine.  Which comes from the bladder.  Not the bowel.  I know smoking can lead to bladder cancer wherein a urostomy bag may be a solution.  But as you were colon/rectum specific, this adds to the idiocy of this campaign.

Not. Cool.

This campaign is not helpful.  Not at all.  It is poorly though out, threatening versus helpful, cutting to those who live every day thanks in large part to their Ostomies, and it’s willfully ignorant.

No thank you Tobacco Free Florida.

Try again.

Because I’m not having it.

*Disclaimer – I am a Permanent Ostomate due to Crohn’s Disease.  In addition I do not now, nor have I ever used tobacco products.  If I had my way everyone would be able to honestly say the same.  I have seen the destruction that all types of tobacco products have on a family.  Because an entire family is harmed, not just the addict.  I do not support smoking or tobacco use.  Its ravages, guilt, and extreme pull on a person have been purposefully designed to be that way by an industry that still operates and I wonder why.  I have seen loved ones try, fail, and try again to quit.  They are strong, in a way I could never fully understand, for having the courage to struggle and fight to win against addiction.*

Gallbladder Surgery

The last couple of days I’ve been busy with surgery pre prep. This includes doing things like packing my hospital bag (Packing Video)

Prepping a week of outfits for my children.

Clothes for the week for the kiddos.
Clothes for the week for my kiddos. The littles wake up and put the clothes on their sleepy little bodies. Less morning stress for everyone = Win!

Thinking ahead about little lunches to pack.

Fruit cups to make lunches and snacks for the week a snap.
Fruit cups to make lunches and snacks for the week a snap.

And in the past I have even done this.

Food to eat while I'm away?  Check!
Food to eat while I’m away? Check!

And tidying my bathroom and closet/dresser. (Which happens to be nervous cleaning with the benefit of coming home to a clutter free, stress free environment.) And just making sure everything is set to go smoothly while I am away for a couple days.  Aka paying just arrived bills, make sure my volunteer time at the school is covered, make sure drop off and pick up times are written down for my hubby, practice speech with the little guy so it’s easier for when he practices with his Daddy, etc etc.
You get the drift.

The surgery that I am having is a gallbladder removal. My gallbladder has been a quiet offender for the last nine years.  It was hiding as mysterious pain that I passed off as overexerting myself or being a weekend warrior and unexplained increased liver levels resulting in unfavorably high numbers that over time magically resolved.  What finally helped us put it together was this last December I passed a gallstone which landed me in the ER. Yow, that was exciting!

Gallstone ER visit.
Gallstone ER visit.

So the deal with gallbladders is they help aid digestion by storing bile created by the liver, then releasing that bile, aka gall, into the digestive tract which helps break down and emulsify fats to help digest your food. Yay!

However, when your gallbladder gets cranky and inflamed or maybe tossing stones, is when things start going sideways. Stones can back up into the liver causing liver issues, which is something I am dealing with. And sometimes stones can back up into the pancreas and cause issues there as well. Also, as in my case, once stones start moving through, a bunch get together and decide to work their way out which is painful as can be. So that’s why I’m going in.

Much of the time gallbladders can be removed laparoscopically. Which sounds terrific. There’s less down time and a smaller incision. Very good things. But, if you’re like me, and you’ve had a couple too many abdominal surgeries, there is a higher opportunity for scar tissue which makes the laparoscoping (<—-Yes, I made that word up) harder than it has to be. In essence, it makes the surgeons job tricky in that scar tissue creates an obscured environment for her/him to see and maneuver to do the job.

So I’m having a standard incision below the ribs right above the gallbladder. This will make a straight shot in for surgeon to clearly see the offending area and do his/her job.

Laparoscopic versus open procedure.
Laparoscopic versus open procedure.  Photo credit: Surgeryinfo.org

This plan of action is good for a couple of reasons.

1) Scar tissue is a beast and I am Fantastic at growing scar tissue. I’ve even had surgery in the past to remove scar tissue. So I’m pretty sure there’s a bunch in there. I don’t want my surgeon to go in laparoscopically and then have to turn around and require standard entry. *Zero hitches in the plan!*

2) If the ducts that lead to the liver and pancreas need to be flushed, Voila!, there’s plenty of room to do that.

3) Another scar to rock on the beach! No, not really. But yes, really. For the damage this little gallbladder time bomb is turning out to be, removing it will be worth the battle scar. And let’s be real. I play organ favorites. I just like my liver and pancreas WAY more than a sputtering, malfunctioning gallbladder. So there!

4) The bile produced by the liver to aid in digestion will still happen. Instead of going through the gallbladder, it will empty into the small bowel to begin its digestive aiding job there. (Whew! Thank goodness I still have that part.) If I had a colon still, I may experience looser stools. As an Ileostomate, this is already the case, so less of an issue for me.  Score for being an Ileostomate!

Things I am going to keep in mind moving forward is diet. I am already an infrequent fatty food enjoyer. That’s one point for me. Plus we officially live 1000 miles away from my very favorite corn dog stand located in Otis Oregon. So in that regard I’m safe. But it’s those festival, Oktoberfest, onion ring, occasional joyful moments that I will have to be more mindful of. *Gasp! * Don’t forget ~ SUPERBOWL!! Well, it must be time to perfect those boneless hot wings. <—-See? I love food. And I will continue to do so thoughtfully.

In the end I am grateful that I am not having a bowel surgery. For ONCE I’m not going in for IBD. I am grateful that being an Ostomate is actually sort of helpful in this case. I am grateful that the surgeon doing my procedure is also top notch in Ostomates of all sorts. (Which is a BIG deal to me.) I look forward to improved liver function and no more painful stones passing. I am glad to be having this done at a time when the rest of my world is relatively calm. I am super grateful that my husband is able to take time away from work to care for our children.

Most of all I look forward to getting back to regular life. I have plans in action that I want to see through and a life that needs living with me at my best.

Ostomy Pants!

How I got all crafty and refashioned the waistband of my pants to fit better without rubbing or cutting into my stoma. Yay! I can wear my jeans.  Check out this really cool way to make Ostomy Pants!  (Or fix any waist band really)

After all, you are perfect just the way you are.  Make your clothes fit you.  Not the other way around.

Ostomy Tag Q & A

I was tagged by Megan of Front Butt You Tuber to participate in the Ostomy Tag Q & A. Basically answer 10 questions about being an Ostomate and tag three more Ostomate friends.

So, thank you Megan of Front Butt You Tuber for the nomination. If you want to find her go to: https://www.facebook.com/thefrontbuttyoutuber?fref=ts

In return I nominate:
Christy of Ostomy on the Track https://www.facebook.com/OstomyOnTheTrack?fref=ts

Marisa Lauren Troy of JournalingIBD https://www.facebook.com/JournalingIBD?fref=ts

Stephanie of The Stolen Colon https://www.facebook.com/thestolencolon?fref=ts

Ostomy Number One

It’s no secret. I love my Ostomy. I really, really do. But it wasn’t all fantastic exuberance. I started out unsure, scared and entirely uneducated. It was rocky y’all.

In my life I have had three Ostomies. Today I will share with you the origins of Ostomy number one.

I was seventeen. I had been sick for years. The first day I ever heard about an Ostomy or that you can even live with part of your bowel removed was when I was in the hospital during a hard flare that we were unable to control. Not a new thing at all for me. I had just come from a semi sedated colonoscopy and still felt bloated and painful from the procedure. I knew it was bad when the screen was turned away and the doctor got very quiet, annunciated his words and became very serious. He was face to face with the living monster that is IBD, trying to remain professional. As an adult who has been on the business end of a doctor clicking into ‘work mode’ I understand he was taking samples, noting disease symptoms and more. As a teenager lying on the table, I felt broken and wrong. Vulnerable. As if I was what he was angry about, not the disease actively chewing up the insides of a young girl. It was painful, scary and very isolating.

A few hours later the doctor came into my private room located at the end of the hall. My grandparents followed behind, grim looks on their faces, they found a place against the wall. Doc came to stand by the side of my bed and said something along the lines of. ‘You need surgery to remove your colon. You are not responding to treatments. You are going to have an Ostomy’. I started to cry. How do you live without your intestines? Then he got mad, raised his voice and scolded me to Stop Crying! ‘You are going to have this surgery and you are going to be Just Fine! People live without part of their bowel all the time. And You are going to be one of them.’
Head swirling, I half heard words about a surgeon he had contacted to do the procedure and he was off.

And that was it.

I had zero information. My grandparents could offer nothing but sorrowful glances in the now very cold room. I felt light headed as the blood drained from my face. I tried to wrap my mind around the idea of being purposefully hollowed out and surviving that. What kind of life would that be? My grandfather had been a medic during the war and through all my bleeding, painful episodes and late night fevers, he was a rock. Not anymore. With a grim set to his mouth he repeatedly cleared his throat, swallowing hard. Damn! He’s trying not to cry. My grandmother gave up on even trying to keep it together as her flowered hanky shakily dabbed already puffy, tear streaked eyes. Grandpa snapped into action, grabbed grandma by the shoulders and firmly escorted her out of the room. Just as he passed the door he looked back, eyes tracing my form from feet up, then connected with mine. He paused and called me my special name only my grandfather is allowed to use, and left with my grandma before him. I heard feet echoing down the hall and my grandmas full on crying.

I was left alone.

Well, Shit!

Looking back, that time in my life had been one very long flare with moments of ‘all hands on deck, she may not make it through this one’. So many hospital stays, medications, blood transfusions, z-tracking iron into my butt, IV hydrations, banana bags, Gatorade and pureed food. I was trying my best but barely squeaking by. I was overly familiar with illness and pain. It was part of my identity to the point where being defeated by IBD was a very real possibility that I had begun to be okay with. I held hands with death as lightly as possible. I didn’t want for it to sweep me away. But in an odd way death was more of a possibility at that time than growing up was. Most of me was fighting, but a small part tickled against the back of my brain that the fight I was giving was really not working that well and one day my battle may be over whether I wanted another go at treatments or not.

I even had ‘the talk’ with my grandparents where my funeral was planned out. I numbly worked out my wishes about end of life care, resuscitation, organ donor status, even a somewhat healthy picture was chosen for my obituary.

This was life at seventeen for me.

IBD was artful in its scraping away at my youth. It savored my childhood and was desperate to take more.

What I dealt with health-wise made high school stress, bullying and all the other things teens deal with feel both inconsequential and insurmountably difficult. There was no easy place in my life back then.

But then came a new way to fight I had never heard of.

Ostomy

I was admitted a day before the procedure into a private room in the big city teaching hospital an hour from where we lived. In perfect timing with a desperate need of a break from drinking, then vomiting the Go Lightly, my surgeon came to visit, followed by a gaggle of students in white coats. They listened intently as my surgeon and I talked. My surgeon is the nicest, most intelligent woman I have ever met. She ignored those students and focused on making sure I understood the procedure I was about to undergo. She sat on the bed beside me, pen in hand, drawing on the sheet as she spoke. The images she created on the stiff white cotton came to life as pen imitated needle and finger became scalpel. My curiosity turned to hope under the light of her knowledge. She spoke quietly but excitedly as she wove the words that created my new life of Stoma, Ostomy and J-Pouch. All questions answered and mind filled with possibility, she and her team left.

What was blank unknowing filled with guesses and assumptions became confidence. By the time she was done visiting I Believed I was going to be better. I looked forward to the procedure. I felt like a member of the team. This thing wasn’t being ‘done to me’. I was an eager participant.

From then on Dr. D was my Dr. Frankenstein and I would be her lovely little monster. Re created from parts that were otherwise broken into something marvelous and fantastic. I was made new again.

Early the next morning nurses carefully prepped me. I was first in line for the surgical suite. They made that sound fancy. As I stood with gown pulled to the side we designated a stoma site. The other nurse, gathering the belongings I had placed in a clear hospital bag turned to compliment the choice. ‘Okay’ I thought to myself ‘This is working out already. I can do this.’

In a chilled room, laying on the gurney amongst shelves with positioning blocks, supplies and rolling carts covered with fabric, I was given my IV and covered with another blanket. Curious, I asked what all those things were for. A nurse counting white gauze squares set her stack aside, answered, then gestured to a set of double doors indicating the operating room. ‘Ah, that’s where the magic happens.’ After a while a gentleman held up a syringe and asked what I wanted to dream about. ‘All the things I’m going to do when I’m healthy again.’ What will you do first? ‘Go to the beach.’ That sounds great. I watched as he pressed the liquid into my IV. The head of my gurney was lowered and the countdown began. 10, 9, 8…..7?…..

And that’s when my life began again. I woke up cozy and warm, covered in heated blankets. It felt like I was only asleep for a few minutes and magically placed in another room where a nurse brought me to reality by forcefully ordering me to Breathe Deeper! Your oxygen is too low. You need to try harder and show me you’re with me. Getting closer, she peers in my eyes. I had not realized she had been speaking to me before now. Gosh she’s grumpy. Here I am all cozy, staying out of trouble and she’s all worked up. Breathing. Pfft. Oh! Rubbing me hard on my upper arm, her words finally click in. Ah, I get it. In through the nose, out through the mouth so she knows I’m trying. She greets me. Realizing I can understand and respond to her words she asks if I know where I am.

I am moved to a room and the learning curve began. I saw my Ostomy for the first time. Walked that evening. Learned to empty my bag. Switched from liquid to soft foods. Learned to change my Ostomy. Walked more. Changed my Ostomy all by myself. Felt good enough to wear sweat pants and began to learn how to wear an Ostomy under clothes.

During that time I transitioned into myself. Life really did get better.

No more pureed food. Woo Hoo! Real food tasted so good it was downright colorful washes of happy, tingly euphoria to eat again. I went to the beach, water park and had more energy at school. I helped my friend buck hay (much to the chagrin of my surgeon) and even went to a couple school dances.

And that’s where my story leaves off.
That was my first Ostomy.

CCFA Fundraising Through Spin

This past weekend my super cool Gastroenterologist invited me to participate in a spin like Soul Cycle Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America fund raiser.

First off I was sold on the description of ‘Party on a Bike’ and something about glow sticks. ‘Scuse me, but glow sticks automatically raise the fun level of any event and ‘party’ equals good music.

All to benefit the CCFA? I love the CCFA!

This whole thing sounded like fun before I even got there.

Heck YES! Count me in.

So after a quick online registration to reserve my spot and prompt RSVP, I Googled what I had gotten myself into.

Indoor Cycling.  Thanks Wikipedia.

Oh yah, I can do this!

My plan was to go and have fun, but pace myself so I didn’t end up falling off the bike in a pile of limp sweaty exhaustion, promptly followed by barfing on the floor.
Reachable goals ~ I can manage that.

The ride itself was held at The Rush Studio in Carmel Valley.  A lovely location with friendly staff not too far from the beach.

I arrived a tad early to a bright, welcoming atmosphere where already jazzed people were visiting, contributing to the donation box and signing up for the raffle. Everyone was excited about the ride, seeing each other and supporting the CCFA. The ladies at the front desk helped me out with paperwork and shoes. In no time I was off to make my own donation, visit and get bedazzled with fancy glow accessories. I can see why people like to come to The Rush. It’s the perfect setting.

After stowing my back pack it was time to grab towels and water bottle then head on in.

As I was a rookie, I chose a spot in the second row next to a gentleman in a white shirt which I was hoping would glimmer under the black lights. Decked out in CCFA orange and blue glow necklace and bracelets, I familiarized myself with the bike and looked around pleased to see the studio mostly full. All cycles faced a mirrored wall where a platform with room for two bikes faced us, front center stage. The lights dimmed as instructor Beth and co instructor Dr. Tommy welcomed everyone with intros and synchronous stretching. And that’s when the atmosphere changed.

It began fast, fun and sweaty. Hey, this is all the awesome of bike riding without exhaust fumes and traffic lights. I’m really digging it. The electrifying playlist chosen by Tommy kept us excited about moving to upbeat rhythms that gave the event a dance club feel. What started out as festive turned into challenging and hot as the microphone amplified voice encouraged ‘Right, Left, Right, Left, Push, Push fast as you can. Harder!’

Momentum increased as the locked in spin shoes allowed for pulling up with one leg as the other pushed against the suggested resistance in a constant circuit of pressing past personal boundaries. Legs burning, tummy tucked in, I worked to coordinate lifting off the saddle in a push up formation against the towel covered handle bars. And then again boosting out of the seat, pumping legs, with one arm raised in the air in upward reaching movements.

Arms and back agreed with buns that spin is a legitimate work out much more comprehensive than the hill hiking I had been doing to make myself think I was fit. I was a fool. This kicks hiking’s ass!

It was easy to get caught up in the wave of determination. The efforts of those around me, the voice of the instructor and the beats of the music; familiar, lyrical words enveloped me in the dimmed room, encouraging to push past the burn and give more of myself. There was grunting and sweat. Pressing up and back so hard the bike rocked on the floor. Warrior sounds from a couple bikes over. This spin thing is no joke! Legs finally got over the initial shock as fire turned to warmth. Then what was beautiful discomfort became a rush of adrenaline and heavenly endorphins. I felt like a candle lit from within. This must be the magic glow that people who love spin talk about.

The pace increased as we moved through a series of stand n’ tap our buns on the saddle, up and down motions that made me aware of a whole different muscle group hiking totally missed. As the spinning slowed pace, we focused on arms. No body part shall be neglected!  As I went through the movements, I reasoned how odd it would look if all these lovely legs, buns, backs and tummies were accompanied by spindly arms and shoulders. Then promptly redoubled efforts to match the work I put into my lower half moments ago.

And then, almost abruptly, the class was over.

We did it! There was an odd sensation of time warp as somehow 45 minutes felt like 15. I high fived the steamy gentleman beside me and twisted my shoe out of the lock to hook my leg over the arm rests for the final blissful class cool down stretch.

We were thanked for our participation and the raffle winner announced. I took my first steps on legs that felt wobbly at first, finding solid ground again with feet that had grown accustomed to pedaling.

Looking around I could see these were not the same fresh participants swagged out in glow necklaces, glasses, and headgear that had started this adventure. We were a mass of smiling, red cheeked, champions.

The Rush Studio CCFA Fundraiser
After the fun. Can you tell we’re glowing?
The Rush Studio CCFA Fundraiser
And with the black lights and glow swag. How fun was this ?!

It was an empowering, affirming, CCFA goal centered team effort. I was so honored to have been a part of it.

And here’s the cool thing about it all. Spin lover or no, this was an example of highlighting your passions and living your happiest in a way that helps others. Dr. Tommy Yen used his love of cycling to support his love for the IBD community. Team Yen raised $300.00 that day for the CCFA, with more financial contributions added later.

Thank you to Dr. Tommy Yen. Way to go with all your awesome!
Instructor Beth Abramowitz of The Rush for leading all the fun.  You are way cooler than Wikipedia said you would be.
To my new IBD friend Ryan Hill. It was so nice to meet you.
And to all the other participants for spinning, contributing, and making the day a great one.

<3 Christy

Stoma Bruise

Living in a southern climate, in a home with zero air conditioning, it gets pretty darned HOT in our little rental house. So my husband and I got all brilliant and made our large family room into the ‘cool room’. Thank you to Costco, we were able to find just the right portable air cooler/de humidifier for a room that size. To maintain the refreshingly chilled atmosphere, we have draperies hung in the entry ways. Since then we have been enjoying the summer feeling comfortable and quite a bit clever about the whole thing.

Until yesterday.

Rushing around in preparation for kiddo swim class I was busily working on getting last minute water bottles filled and towels collected when I ran into this:

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The Culprit

This banister lives right on the other side of the cool room drapes. Turns out that it’s exactly the height of my stoma. Like it was planned that way, but not really. At any rate, I collided into this at full tilt.

Well Crap!  Not what I planned on doing today.
Well Crap!  NOT what I planned on doing today.

And straight to the floor cupping myself while I did some deep breathing. Then off to the bathroom to check that I hadn’t torn my stoma or caused active, hospital type bleeding.

Day two and already looking better.
Day two and already looking better.

In my self examination I noted: No laceration, yes my stoma was still attached to my abdomen, yes my stoma was bleeding from the abrasion. The bottom half was strikingly bruised, scraped raw, tight, lopsided and srunk in on itself.

Yikes was he mad!

I felt like I had been kicked in the guts, which was essentially the case. But more of an accidental self banistering of sorts. After applying pressure I got the bleeding to stop and was grateful it wasn’t as bad as it first looked.

I have run into my stoma before, but this time I did quite the number on myself. Here I am a day later and my stoma is still mad but healing rapidly.  The bruising yesterday was much darker.  The abrasions began to look better right away.  I’m thinking because of blood supply, guts heal from scuffs and run ins better than knees?  But I’m no expert on stoma injuries and don’t plan to be.  My little guy is still mis shapen and I’ll call it ‘dented’ in the area where it was hit hardest which didn’t show up very well in the picture.  But even that looks to be improving as well.  I’m guessing this will take the same time to heal as a regular bruise.

And here’s the deal. If I know I’m going to be moving again, or helping someone else move, stacking wood, volunteering for an activity where there’s a good chance I’m going to get knocked in the can, or other wildly fun activity, I happily wear a stoma guard. Or if I had a job where I would be repeatedly irritating my stoma with tasks I performed daily, I would wear one. I own a stoma guard that I like. It’s small and stays put when I move. So that’s not a problem at all.  But when I’m just going about my regular ol’ life, I’m not going to wear a guard. Very few people brace themselves and stay constantly on guard for every day bodily injury/catastrophe. And I’m not one of them. It’s just not how I function.

Try to hurt me now.  I dare ya!
Try to hurt me now. I dare ya!

And so I do the next best thing.

No banisters harmed in this water noodling. I like that it’s easy to remove as well. And no, it’s not exactly pretty. But it is better than a hospital stay if I’m not so lucky next time.

Turns out The Husband runs into this banister frequently and even injured his foot with swelling and bruised results. We both will benefit from this fix.

I figure if life kicks you in the can sometimes, or you’re an occasionally magnificent klutz, like moi, just add a few creative adjustments to make life less painful.

A Boy, A Bikini, and an Ostomy

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For once, I’m not writing a blog on an airplane to kill some time. Christy mentioned an issue that I feel needs to be addressed immediately.

In light of all the bikini shots that have been going around, and the recent media attention surrounding them, a few very good questions have rolled her way. One of them caught my eye as it pertained directly to my past behavior. But first, a bit of context for those who like context….

On a long flight to Philadelphia, roughly two years ago, I wrote a blog for Crohniebolognaibd.com that got split into two parts. They reflected the events and my feelings that were involved in my wife’s permanent ostomy. There is some heavy stuff in there, and I still get a bit emotional thinking about it. Several times in the course of our marriage Christy has nearly died due to Crohn’s, and I believe the events that occurred during her recovery from her permanent ostomy was the closest she came to leaving me a widower. That is in Part 1. The information under the ‘Ballroom’ portion of Part 2 contains some of the context pertaining to the question I need to address and answer.

Surfing a few of the posts from various Crohn’s and Ostomy websites, there has been a recurring concern since the whole ‘Ostomate Wearing a Bikini’ media storm in early July. And that concern, and the reason why I’m writing this brief post, is “I am a woman with an ostomy, and my husband/fiancé/boyfriend does not want me to wear a bikini in public.” So, let’s dive into this and I’ll give you my perspective as a non-ostomate in a committed relationship with an ostomate.

Every man is different, and every man will react in a different way to various situations. That said, I think I can weigh in on this one with some level of accuracy. There are three likely POSITIVE causes for his reluctance for you to wear a bikini in public. I say ‘positive’ because if you are in a bad relationship, then all of my advice and insights are not going to be helpful. Those three things are: Overprotectiveness, Anxiety, and Fear. Not great words to associate with ostomate boy-toy’s eh? Doesn’t make it untrue as I went through each and every one of these emotional states.

I was Overprotective of my wife. I did not want people to judge her for her ostomy. They didn’t know her; didn’t know what she went through. And it was not fair for them to make assumptions based upon the gear hanging off of her abdomen. But…they WOULD make assumptions, and they would say something to ruin her day. Or….at least that is what my overprotective emotions were relaying to me. I must do all I can to help her hide her gear so she doesn’t have some asshole make a stupid remark!

I had anxiety because I didn’t want to deal with the fallout from those stupid remarks. People MUST NOT FIND OUT that she has an ostomy! If they do, they’ll give her shit, and I’ll have to deal with the emotional fallout! I’ll have to spend days or weeks helping her feel better and find ways to make life not suck! I want our lives to be happy, not ruled by the sadness that is going to come from some random jerk or judgey people.

And I felt Fear. It isn’t normal to have ostomy gear on display to the public. Women should look like they do on TV, in department store ads, and in the general public eye! A woman should be without flaw….and if a flaw is detected, physical or behavioral, then she will be ostracized as badly as Hester Prynne.   That scarlet letter on her abdomen will be a mark upon our relationship that will destroy any chance we have at a normal life!

Some or all of those are problems your man battles with in that grey-matter between his ears. Contrary to sitcoms and general stereotypes, men are VERY emotional, we just like to think we can hide our emotions. The overprotective, anxious fear he feels could be a direct result of his love for you and his need for the relationship to not fall into turmoil or a quagmire of depression and sadness. Is the possibility of your relationship being defined and dominated by your ostomy? No. Not a snowball’s chance in hell. Is the possibility that he has trouble dealing with the public perception of an ostomy and for this reason he has a fixation on 1-piece swimming suits? Almost definitely.

With that said, here’s how you deal with this problem of public perception.

Be yourself!

The ostomy doesn’t define you. It doesn’t change how you act and react to the roses and poo thrown at you in the course of your life. If you want to wear a bikini, wear one. He’ll get used to it or he’ll leave you . If he leaves you, it’ll hurt, but ultimately he likely would not have passed critical line: “for better or for worse, in sickness and in health”. Christy kept her outgoing nature and I was able to eventually get over my anxiety and overprotectiveness.

Mental Tricks!

Make him aware of a philosophy I picked up a while ago. I’m not sure how or where I ran across it, but the philosophy goes something like this: You care about yourself more than other people care about you. This philosophy works in two ways. An example of how it applied to ‘me’….I have some anxiety when making public speeches, and it took many years for me to figure out that this little item was causing me more anxiety than was reasonable. I was too worried about what people thought about me, and it was causing me to focus too damn much on the fear and anxiety of how they would react to what I was saying.

Turn the sentence/philosophy around and look at the other side. They are too preoccupied with their own life to care about my speech. Odds are, they will forget 75% of what I said, and the 25% that remains will only be a vague memory of the content of the speech, not what I was wearing, or my hair cut, or whether I stuttered mid-speech.

Once he understands thatNobody Cares

1.) We aren’t in High-School anymore, and

2.) Joe Blow on the beach cares more about what he is doing than judging your life, he will get beyond any applicable public fear.

A person is able to be himself, and let their significant other be herself. And hell…. I guarantee he’ll be a happier person!

 

Dismiss the Jerks!

Some people are jerks. They insult for the fun of insulting. Most of them are young, inexperienced people who, according to any game of Call of Duty I’ve ever played, had intercourse with my mother on several occasions. Eventually they may graduate high school and experience the real world. Then they will not have time to devote to attempting to boost their self-worth by reducing other people’s self-worth. Dismiss these cretins. Tell him that these idiots don’t matter one whit to your life or relationship. ….. maybe word that into a more flowery, tactful way….. In general, not letting some stupid jerk mess with your head, regardless of whether you are an ostomate, boyfriend of an ostomate, have red hair, have big hips, are too fat or too thin, are straight or gay, have freckles, dimples, or are wearing your ‘weekend cleaning clothes’, or are generally living life, then you will find yourself dwelling more on the good things life has to offer, than what some stranger said in an attempt to look cool or feel superior.

However, if they go too far, don’t be surprised if your boyfriend/husband punches them in their stupid face. There are limits to the types of verbal abuse we will allow someone to say at/to our significant others or close friends.

Baby Steps!

Buy your bikini, but buy a few sarongs to go with it. The first time you wear the bikini around him, wear the sarong 90% of the time. Then next time you are with him, 80% and 70%, and so on. Not only do sarongs look hella sexy on women, but it’ll give him a bit of that middle-ground between a bikini and a 1-piece. As time goes on, wearing a sarong won’t even matter anymore because he’ll have acclimated to the bikini AND he’ll have realized that the majority of people just don’t care that you are an ostomate wearing a bikini on the beach.

see nobody cares-bikini

 

Here’s an excerpt from Part 2 that I feel is still relevant and highly applicable to this post:

“Perhaps if your guy-dude-person-spouse is being overprotective, or he is pushing for longer shirts, one-piece swimsuits, or whatever, don’t assume he is ashamed to be around you, or with you, or of you.  He may just be worried about stupid people saying shit to you that will hurt your feelings for no good reason.  It only takes one snarkey emotionally shallow teenager to ruin your day.  I don’t want to see any day’s ruined.  That is no excuse for me to hold my wife back from her outgoing, expressive self.  And as long as I can recognize WHY I feel the way I feel, I can check myself when I need checking.  But it did take me some time to get to the point where I could realize these emotions.  So, if your spouse is doing stuff that seems to be overprotective, this may be why.”

 Every relationship has its semi-unique issues. The older I get, the more I understand that all relationships have some crazy and wild stuff happening. A kid with hemophilia, a crazy family member, cancer, depression, infidelities, poverty, severe disabilities, Alzheimers. The list is expansive and emotional. The thing is, if everyone is going through this stuff, then those complete strangers are too preoccupied with their own issues to devote more than a brief portion of their life to your problems. The things that trouble you matter only to your significant other, to your close friends, and to your own self-worth. Realizing this, you and your significant other will find you have the emotional freedom to enjoy you walking around, sunbathing, and swimming in that bikini.

Be well my friends.

#GetYourBellyOut

So there I was having a bad hair day.  To top it off I had laundry to fold.  Not horrid.  But not fabulous either.  To cheer myself up I slapped on a green bandanna to cover my hair, and match my green bikini, spiffed up my ostomy bag with some barrettes, and set out to the back yard where I staged the laundry baskets around my picnic table.  Folding laundry on a sunny day is exactly the spoon full of sugar to make everything far more delightful.

Kids are crafting, I’m folding and somewhere in all that new found industrious zen I decide to officially submit a pic to the #GetYourBellyOut campaign. (There is also a community support page on Facebook)  Why not?  I’d posted many a pic of my belly before.  This is a movement for education that I’d seen and thought was quite clever.  It was my turn to participate. In no time flat a pic was shared. Cheers to education and advocacy. Ostomates go to the beach like everyone else. Yay!

4th of July fun at the beach.
Here’s the picture. 4th of July fun at the beach.

And then this happened:

I’m in an article in the El Diario. vvv
Bikini photo inspires hundreds of patients with Crohn’s disease

 

Turns out, that pic shared to a closed group ended up out in the world. *Several lessons learned for me.* In the end I decided to own the situation and shared that same image on my own twitter et al.

Now if I may please add a couple gentle corrections.  This article talks only about Colostomy bags as though all bags are the Colostomy variety.
There are:
Colostomy~ a stoma coming from the colon to exit stool
Ileostomy~ a stoma coming from the small intestine or ileum to exit stool
Urostomy~ a stoma coming from the bladder or ureters to exit urine
And any combo there within.
The general term would be Ostomate.

In addition, the article suggests that Bethany’s pic ‘triggered a movement’ where people then began to share their Ostomy selfies.  This is not true.  Perhaps some people saw Bethany’s pic and decided to share.  Which is great if people have felt empowered by her.  However, her share did not trigger a movement more than it highlighted a movement for education and awareness that was already there.  To read Bethany’s original feature here she states ‘She got in touch with Crohn’s and Colitis UK Facebook group to see if they would let her post something on their page.’  Bethany sought her local education and awareness group to see if she could participate.  And good for her.  From there the world of Facebook took notice.  She started conversations that have lead to greater awareness.  Cheers to her for that.


Now that I have cleared up those errors I can say that the media seems to be slowly improving in a way I appreciate.  They are showing Ostomates in a good light which I hope will lead to a break down of negative stereotypes.  And they’re getting the terms more accurate over time. We need much more of that.

 

*Updating to add because it’s very much the same photo and article regurgitated into different papers. Does no one respect original writers or what?*
I’m on the cover of The Huffington Post below Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany. THAT is never going to happen again.

On the front cover below
On the front cover below Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany.

Here’s a link to that Huffington Post article

There were more news outlets as well….

Wallstreeter

Women’s Rights News

Neatorama

In the end I learned a lot from this experience, both positive and negative.
The laundry got folded, the world kept moving and my Grandma was pretty impressed about the Angela Merkel thing.

Of Course Ostomates are Sexy!

When it came to Bethany Townsend, 23, from Worcester, the world, or at least the world of Facebook, overwhelmingly agreed. Bethany is physically striking.  And sexy.  Ostomy and all.  Townsend posted her pic on the Crohn’s and Colitis UK Facebook page. Her image was viewed by more than nine million people and has received 190,000 likes. That number just keeps growing.

Definite conversation starter.

Cheers to the power of a well posed selfie.

But along with the messages of support, ‘Hey, my mom/dad/brother went through that.’ and the ‘You’re so brave.’  There is also a sense of surprise.  Like people are just now noticing IBD, and especially Ostomates at all. But more specifically they’re seeing us in a good light.  As if the negative stereotype of Ostomates in their mind just got challenged.  In a good way.  Don’t get me wrong, that’s terrific, but hardly new news to the rest of us.

In the being brave, strong, lovely and even sexy category, Bethany isn’t alone. Not by a long shot. There are scores of beautiful Ostomates out there. So much so that Awestomy had its own #right2remainsexy campaign in July and August of 2013, giving all Ostomates the open door to proudly bask in their sexiness while encouraging others to do the same.  Empowering, validating confirmation of our continued ability to be seen as beautiful and desirable in a way many would automatically think of as ‘no longer an option’.

Vanilla Blush is another company promoting self esteem and Ostomate loveliness for all. It’s absolute perfection that Nicola Dames uses real Ostomates as models.  Not one person can dispute that those who pose for Blush are highly qualified for their positions.

And that’s what’s beautiful.  Each person that posted to Awestomy or poses for Vanilla Blush are regular people like you and I.

You know what’s really sexy?

(Because sexy isn’t just the skin deep attributes that look good in magazines or there wouldn’t be a big push to put ‘real’ people in ads.)

DUH!

It’s being okay in your own skin.  It’s confidence and openness to life.  It’s loving yourself exactly for who you are.  It’s being intelligent, educated about your disease and having the poise to represent that truthfully to the world.  It’s a kind of charisma that’s earned.

Just look around our IBD community. There are legions of intelligent, beautiful, clever, inspiring Ostomates, J-Pouchers and IBDers out there.  It could be that special someone who inspires you, who encourages you, who makes you smile or laugh. Someone who makes you feel like you’re not the only one.  That person who’s been through exactly what you have, and come out the other side.  That person open enough to share in a way that shows you hope that maybe you can try again and get there too.

I made a little list of just a few of the people who inspire me.  I admire their dedication to the IBD community and their willingness to share their journeys with us.  These people are beautiful to me.

Jason of Awestomy
Sara Ringer of Inflamed and Untamed
Maggie Baldwin of Let’s talk IBD
Sam Cleasby of So Bad Ass
Jess Grossman of Uncover Ostomy
Dan Sharp of The Great Bowel Movement
Christy of Ostomy on the Track
Paul Riome of Living Bigger with Colostomy
Frank Garufi Jr of The Crohn’s Colitis Effect
Marisa Lauren Troy of Keeping Things Inside Is Bad For My Health

And of course the list goes on…  I could easily continue.  Suffice it to say, these people are inspiring, beautiful and lovely to me.

So, great job Bethany for the selfie seen ’round the world.  People are talking, cheering you on and hopefully viewing Ostomates and the IBD community as a whole in a more beautiful light.

Now if only we can segue all that instant recognition into education.  That would be the most beautiful of all.

Sick but lovely
Because it isn’t always pretty.

CCFA Take Steps San Diego~ De Anza Cove

Last year I went to my first Take Steps for Crohn’s & Colitis event. I was invited by my super cool Gastro and thought it sounded like a fun thing to try.  Why not?

Last years team pic.
Last years team pic.

In fact it was so great that I immediately began looking forward to going again.

The first thing I did was look for the sign in booth.  Before I even got to the table I met a super nice lady who saw my Ask Me shirt and we got to chatting.  She excitedly told me about her Ostomy experience and shared her enthusiasm for upcoming treatments.  How about that for an awesome welcome?!  I love my IBD community.

Anyhoo, I got signed in and went straight for the booths.  I didn’t spend enough time investigating them last year and felt like I missed out.  So off I went.

*Going for big pics so you can see all the goodness as I walk you through a photo tour of the event.*

The first booth was for a pharmaceutical company.

Ferring Pharmaceuticals.  Their motto is 'Medicine on the body's own terms'.  They work to create individualized treatments = less side effects.  My hope is in time this will be available to everyone at an affordable cost.  How cool would that be.
Ferring Pharmaceuticals.

Their motto is ‘Medicine on the body’s own terms’. They work to create individualized treatments with less side effects. My hope is in time this will be available to everyone at an affordable cost. How cool would that be?  That’s their goal as well.  I can’t wait to see it.

The next booth was MotherToBaby.  They offer support for women on IBD controlling medications who are looking towards pregnancy and breast feeding.  There are legitimate concerns about safety for mother and child when taking meds.  MotherToBaby helps answer those important questions.

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Eight years ago when I was breastfeeding this information wasn’t available. Women today have the tools to make educated decisions. I like that.
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MotherToBaby card with more information.

 

Then there was the MPA Event Graphics booth with the bright sign that drew me in.

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MPA Event Graphics creates beautiful signage.  And they had the best team shirts ever!  So if you need a stunning visual and a company that understands IBDers, this is where you want to go first.

 

Next there was Coastal Gastroenterology, a local Gastro clinic with a super joyful group of people.

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Coastal Gastroenterology is a local gastro clinic.  Nice to see so many options out there for people to receive care.

 

There were larger medical groups as well.  UC San Diego has an IBD Center with a focus on patient education and empowerment.

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UC San Diego is a local teaching hospital. They have a large Gastro center where they offer help for every aspect of care.

 

There were some drug reps.

This one is for CIMZIA.  They have a nifty delivery system, after initial dosing it can be done by the IBDer in their own home.  There’s help available for those who cannot inject themselves.  I was most impressed by the pro human side of it.  Trying to really make it as easy and inobtrusive in a persons life as possible, while still providing a high level of care.  The rep was very good.

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This booth was for REMICADE but the gentleman never really pushed or pressed that Remicade is the very best drug. (Some drug companies do that silly stuff ~ can you believe it?!)  He encouraged a conversation to happen between the IBDer and their gastro.  (Which I respect)  What he did highlight was the cost assistance program they offer.  So of course I grabbed a packet to show you, my Sweethearts.  He also stressed the fact that every costly med out there has an affordability program.  The IBDer just needs to know to ask.

Now you know.

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Front side showing three options available.
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Back side giving contact information.

Affordability Rocks!

 

Loved talking to the researchers.  So passionate, intelligent and personable.  Join research or take part in a study if you can.  Researchers and scientists power to understand IBD and find a cure lies in our willingness to participate.  We are the key to helping our own future.

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Interested in participating in research studies? This is a group that does just that.

 

Take Steps CCFA SWAG.  Woo Hoo!  Totally filling this bag with a snack, sunscreen and a towel then heading to my favorite beach.

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Then came time for the fund raising announcements and listening to the stories of some pretty remarkable IBDers.

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This years announcer Mike did a great job.  Can you see me in the front row in my Great Bowel Movement ‘Ask Me’ t-shirt?  I had the best view. 😉

Mikes presentation on stage was positive, informative and kept the ball rolling towards the true purpose of the event.  The fearless announcer was both entertaining and endearing as he highlighted the efforts of those in the community.  A job well done.

 

After the stage presentation it was time for the walk.  This is where I got to visit with all the people. My very favorite part!  Everyone I spoke to was an example of inspiration, strength, courage and love.  I love my IBD community!

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This sweet mother, daughter duo wearing their Crohn’s fighting shirts made by MPA Event Graphics. Such positive, uplifting and hopeful women in love with their family.

More visiting…

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Chatting with the photographer. He was at last years event and is super nice.

 

Before you knew it the event was wrapping up.

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All good things that start must come to and end.

Thank you CCFA for the Take Steps experience.  My family and I look forward to participating next year.

I love Duck Tape

Glow in the dark Batman!
Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na Na (Glow in the dark) BATMAN!

I love Duck Tape. Classify me as a proud addict. I have been known to turn up the music so I could tape in a ‘party atmosphere’. I have included my kiddos to perpetuate the Duck Tape love, and encourage them to tape on their own. I even keep my tape on a stand (repurposed broken floor lamp) that resembles a stripper pole. When I look at it I giggle inwardly at the naughty secret reference and must confess all those bright colors and artistic possibilities make me giddy. I seriously have the warm fuzzies for the projects to come and frequently crave alone time to draw them out for later completion. The anticipation occupies my mind in a day dreamy warm glow. Yes, I love Duck Tape.

Repurposed broken lamp base aka The Stripper Pole.
Repurposed broken lamp base aka The Stripper Pole. (Tee Hee)

But it’s more than tape on a roll. It’s more than creativity. My love of Duck Tape is an outward expression of love for my anatomy just the way it is. My love affair is the gift of acceptance to Crohn’s Disease, Ostomy and myself as a whole human. When I wear my Duck Tape creations I am most frequently in a bikini on the beach. Just me enjoying life in strategically tied triangles of fabric with Duck Tape, sunglasses and a hat as my only accessories.

I earned the right not to hide.  So I don’t.

Feeling like a Crohn's Cutie in my hipster mustachio Ostomy cover.
Ben snuck this pic of me feeling like a Crohn’s Cutie in my super cool mustachio Ostomy.

 
People look, some stare and others inquire. And you know what? All of that is okay. Because I am okay with me.

Beach ready!
Beach ready!

Woo Hoo!  I found a tape that matches.  Totally made my day.

Dog Beach!
Dog Beach!  Check out my Take Steps visor.  Rock’n!

The one time I tried the ‘nude’ look aka no Duck Tape.  Wet nude bag = see through O.o  No thank you.  Lesson learned.

So if you have Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, J-pouch, Ostomy, Urostomy, scars, tubes, tanks, PICC lines, or what have you.  You have earned the right to not hide.  You deserve to live openly in the sun.  And if a little tape helps you along the way, go for it.

Love you my Sweet Bolognas 😀

Glamorize Your Bag!

How do I cover my Ostomy bags? With the help of Duck Tape I rock my Ostomy bag in style. In this video I show you how I cover my bags, how to remove the fabric liner, how to line up pattern, how to cut around the vent and how to reinforce the backing for a more secure, longer wear time all while looking amazing.

Join me in glamorizing your Ostomy bag, and enjoying your life as lovely as can be.

Happy Earth Day ~Ostomy Wishes.

Earth Day art with my little person.  Crayons and Coffee with my young artist is a great way to start the day.
Earth Day art with my little person. Crayons and Coffee with my young artist is a great way to start the day.

Here it is, Earth Day and I spent the morning sipping coffee and coloring with my preschooler.  We talked about bugs and dirt, oceans and the critters that live in them.  A fabulous way to spend the morning.  Having children, I get to do all the things I loved as a kid (and all the things I wanted to do as well) and share it with them.

As my lil guy began to really concentrate on his picture, pressing hard to get the most wax from his crayon onto the page, I settled into the zen of my own art work.  I thought about all the ways our family goes out of its way to conserve and do its part to use less, own less and live more responsibly.

As an Ostomate and someone who frequently  goes to the doctor, I know that aspect of my life produces a lot of waste.  Every time I change my Ostomy there is a residual bundle of non degradable plastics that goes into the nearest landfill.  As a young person I have years of this brand of predictable consumption and waste ahead of me.

So if Earth Day were like a birthday where I could blow out a candle and make a wish about something I can change in my life, it would be to encourage the thinkers to come up with a way to make Ostomy gear more eco friendly, while keeping the durability and reliability Ostomates require at an affordable price that won’t send both insurance companies and consumers pocket books running for the hills.  *Well if I was going to wish, I’d better make it a good one.*

Happy Earth Day my Sweet Bolognas.